Welcome to my new Blog



Welcome to my Blog.
My Blog is mostly about my hobbies, ie Model boats,Cross Stitch, Gardening, Days out and about and Photography with pictures taken at and around our Model Boat club at Etherow Country Park, where I can be found quite a few days a week on the landing stage, you might recognize the hat and the dog rather than me. My models and other hobbies can be found in the tabs at the top above the header picture.
There will also be entries of days out with my long haired Chihuahua "Pepe", weather permitting of course.

Tuesday, 24 April 2012

To-day's A-Z challenge is U for Uniforms.

I've always been a sucker for Uniforms, perhaps that's because the first time I remember seeing my Dad was in his Navy Uniform home after the war, and I was a very impressionable 7 year old.

He was in Minesweepers, so didn't get back home for quite a while after the war finished.
Talk about one parent families!, we were all one parent families then!.



Blazer badge
The component parts of the badge are a shield bearing a shark (representing a submarine), pierced with a marlin spike, against a background of two mines and a fishing net; with a rather stylised round turn and two half hitches to either side; surmounted by the Royal Navy crown; with below the scroll bearing M-S A-S, representing the two major aspects of Minesweeping and Anti-Submarine duties.

I first met my wife and would you believe it, she was in the Girl Guides,Uniform again.
I was in the regular army, Uniform again,
Only a bridesmaid at this point

  Then came out of the army and joined the Auxiliary Fire Service (volunteer) with a nice Uniform, so did Velda!
Broke the golden rule there from the army, Never volunteer didn't I.

Off to the National Fire Exhibition at Olympia.

During peacetime, AFS crews frequently attended fires and accidents alongside their regular colleagues. They provided significant assistance at some of the worst fires, such as that at Billingsgate Market and at Barking wood yard. AFS personnel were trained in firefighting by their own officers and with assistance from full-time fire officers. Many were trained to the St John Ambulance Higher First Aider Certificate standard - often proving invaluable at major incidents involving injury.
These were never Army vehicles, only painted green as they were to be used in event of hostilities, and later the army used them during the Fire Service disputes,as they were there doing nothing after AFS disbanded years earlier.


Green goddess.

Not to be confused with this one


Then it was on to the Ambulance Service, Uniforms again, so did Velda!

Standard equipment at the time.


Velda working Christmas Eve with me.
  
Now it would seem that Rachel, my eldest grand-daughter as got the bug as she is an item with Ryan

Yes!! you guessed it he's in Uniform!

And last but not least my latest Uniform 

Helping John!.
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They say that children brighten the home. 
That's because they never turn the blooming lights off.

"Mum, Dad's going out again"
"Well pour some more petrol on him again".

The outfit made her look a million dollars, all wrinkled and green.
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That's all Folks, not far to go in the challenge now.

10 comments:

  1. An excellent blog, Duckie
    Very interesting

    Bob

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank God for our people in uniforms.

    Lee
    Weird, weird, weird…
    A Faraway View
    An A to Z Co-host blog

    ReplyDelete
  3. That is a mark 2 minesweeper badge. The original ones had a pin on the back but men kept giving them away to girlfriends as broaches so the Nave bought in the sew on type. The badge was the idea of Churchill who reckoned the minesweeper men were of the bravest men he knew.

    Do you what ships your Dad was on?

    Regards

    Andy Q

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, don't know any names of ships, but he was in Durban, Ceylon, Madagascar and Rangoon, so was well travelled and took a while to get back after the war was over.

      Delete
  4. Bit of bad typing there Nave. Should be Navy sorry.

    AQ

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Pete good blog aagin and very appropriate seeing its Anzac day here in O Z ,Barbara says the name of the ship your dad was on was the Pladder hope your well Bryan

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thank's for the Name Bryan, its all coming back to me now!.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Here you are Andy, the badge.
    The component parts of the badge are a shield bearing a shark (representing a submarine), pierced with a marlin spike, against a background of two mines and a fishing net; with a rather stylised round turn and two half hitches to either side; surmounted by the Royal Navy crown; with below the scroll bearing M-S A-S, representing the two major aspects of Minesweeping and Anti-Submarine duties.

    ReplyDelete
  8. HMS PLADDA was a Isles Class MS Trawler. Pennant number T144
    You can see a pic of her sister ship at www.uboat.net/allies/warships/class/339.html

    Now make a model !!!!!!

    AQ

    ReplyDelete
  9. Just spotted your comments on Durban Ceylon Madagascar and Rangoon, I have happy memories of all those places.
    I wouldn't have liked to be on PLADDA out there with no air-con though.

    AQ

    ReplyDelete